COLLEGE ENGLISH I

Core Curriculum Committee

 

Rationale

College English I helps students develop the proficiencies they will need to succeed in their courses at the University and in life.  Focusing on Reading/Writing, Critical Thinking, and Information Literacy/Fluency, students work with complex primary texts, learning the techniques of close reading and analysis required in the Odyssey courses.  Students learn to read and write expository prose in a variety of forms: persuasive, comparative, argumentative, and theoretical.  In addition to strong ideas and organization, students are expected to demonstrate an understanding of sound grammar, mechanics, and vocabulary.  Prewriting and rewriting techniques stress the importance of gathering, organizing, clarifying, shaping, drafting, and revising material in the production of a paper.  College English I requires students to write short, well-developed papers; using readings from the textbook as models.  The McGraw-Hill Reader, the required text for the course, stresses an interdisciplinary approach to reading and writing, with chapters on “Education;” “History, Culture, Civilization;” “Government, Politics, and Social Justice;” and “Science and Technology.” 

 

Students will also learn the rhetorical strategies of Definition, Process Analysis, Cause and Effect, Division and Classification, Comparison and Contrast, Argument and Persuasion, thereby acquiring a variety of techniques for developing their ideas and arguments.  They will also learn and use other concepts necessary for effective writing, such as Audience, Tone and Stance, Purpose, Logical Fallacies, and Bias in Language.


Thus this course supports two foundational assumptions of the new Core: interdisciplinarity and skill proficiency.



 

Assessment

There are several forms of assessment to determine students’ progress as a result of their work in College English I:

·        Student written work is assessed and commented on for both content and form.  Evaluation is based both on the students’ knowledge and handling of discipline specific material as well as its presentation.  This may include an assessment of the structures of the students’ argument, their organization and development, their use of examples and details, their use of appropriate vocabulary, their understanding of disciplinary standard of writing, and their use of English grammar and sentence structures.  If the assignment included reading and research, the assessment may include an evaluation of how clearly and effectively the student understands, handles, and makes use of the reading.

·        Student e-portfolios will provide an overall assessment of student progress and the effectiveness of course readings and assignments.

·        Department and university course evaluations help both instructors and the department assess student progress and the effectiveness of the program.

·        Annual departmental review and revision of College English I will allow the course to change as needed to meet the needs of students and a changing core curriculum.

 

This course will assess students’ ability to do the following:

                                    1.  use the steps of the writing process—including multiple drafts—to produce a coherent and well-organized essay;

                                    2.  analyze and critically assess different kinds of texts, including visual texts, in order to draw conclusions and make connection; 

                                    3.   use the conventions of English Literary Standard (for example, with respect to syntax, mechanics, grammar and diction);

                                    4.   use textual support to develop ideas, avoiding fallacies, biased language, and inappropriate tone;

                                    5.   write for various purposes and audiences

                                    6.   incorporate ideas derived from a variety of sources (print and electronic) and document them correctly;

                                    7.   write in a variety of modes with complexity and appropriate detail;

      8.   use various computer applications such as word processing, email, and

            Blackboard to facilitate writing;

      9.   recognize and define information needs; demonstrate effective search strategies  

            for finding information; and locate and retrieve relevant information;

                                    10. evaluate and organize the information for use;

                                    11. create and communicate information effectively;

                                    12. describe points of view and practices employed in presentation of information from all sources.

 

Faculty Development

The English Department will provide training for all faculty teaching College English I.  This training will primarily consist of summer workshops, with meetings during the semester as part of the Teaching Portfolio Project (in which all writing instructors are required to participate).  These workshops address issues specific to the courses as well as the teaching of reading/writing.  The library will provide training on incorporating Information Literacy during the summer workshop and will provide orientations for students in both semesters.

 


English Department Syllabus

College English I


2004-2005



 

The department syllabus is designed to help instructors put together their own syllabi for ENGL 1201, College English I.  It includes specific guidelines for teaching the course, entrance requirements, a model course, and suggested assignments.   This syllabus is available on-line (on both the 1201 Website and the Writing Faculty Blackboard Course), so faculty can save it to their computers and use it as a template for creating their own syllabi.   If you are, in fact, reading this syllabus on line, it is also available in hard copy.  See the Director of First Year Writing for a hard copy of this syllabus.

All 1201 courses have their own Blackboard courses.  Faculty should make use of their Blackboard course for course information (where the syllabus should be placed), class discussion/assignments, announcements, and external links.   Encourage your students to check their Blackboard course regularly. 

A large amount of important information about 1201 is available through the 1201 Website.  Check it out for guidelines about teaching the course, grading criteria, and useful links.  This website is a wonderful place to start gleaning ideas and materials for 1201.   If you are using this syllabus on-line, please click on this link http://artsci.shu.edu/english/1201.

The Writing Faculty Blackboard Community should be used regularly by all writing faculty.  For this year, we would like all writing faculty to use it on a regular basis.  Please post your syllabus, assignments, and any other helpful materials (PowerPoint presentations, external links, etc.) in the Writing Faculty Blackboard Community to share with your colleagues.  Go to the Discussion Board of this course to find the appropriate places to post your materials.  Take a few moments each week to check out the entries of your colleagues.  This link is not found under “Courses” but under “Community”: http://setonhall.blackboard.com/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab_id=_3_1.

Anyone teaching in the Writing Program will be added to the Writing Faculty Blackboard Community.  

 



 

 

ENGL 1201-0160                                                                                                          ENGL 1201-0160 functions as an intensive version of ENGL 1201. The requirements are exactly the same except for the number of class meetings and Writing Center visits. The main difference lies almost entirely in the amount of time that students have to master the material. They meet 300 minutes per week instead of 150. Thus there is the opportunity for far more in-class work and discussion. Students can begin assignments in class so that they can raise questions then instead of at midnight. Essays can be discussed more thoroughly and there will be time for more intensive reading and writing instruction. Shorter, more informal writing assignments can help students come up with ideas for essays. Problems noticed in a morning session can be attacked in greater depth in the afternoon session. For all these strategies, the freshman writing website is a resource for the kinds of intensive work with reading and writing that can be planned in this course.

In-Class Tutors for 1201-0160

For two of the class hours each week, a tutor will be assigned to each 1201-0160 class.   These tutors will be the English Department’s Teaching Assistants, who can help in the classroom in a variety of ways.   They can, of course, be used for peer review workshops, going around the room with the instructor and helping students with their papers.  However, this is not the only way to make use of these tutors, who are also faculty members.  You might have the tutor work with small discussion groups, or coordinate one side of a debate while you take the other.  You might work out ways to “team teach,” with you and the tutor modeling a type of discussion.   You might have them help students with their topics, outlines, pre-writing.   Please try to plan to make the most of this asset in the classroom.

A few tips for using the in-class tutors:

There are two purposes for having the in-class tutors.  One, having additional help in the classroom can give the students additional support for in-class activities.   Second, the Teaching Assistants will benefit from their interaction with more experienced faculty.  

Entrance Requirements For College English I (ENGL 1201)
Students who have received a passing score on the Seton Hall University College English Placement Test or have successfully completed ENGL 0100 or 0150ESL are eligible for ENGL 1201.  Instructors will be given a list of the students who have not passed these basic skills courses or who have placed into 1201-0160, the course for almost all students who have not passed the English Placement Test.  If such a student appears in class, he or she must be sent immediately to the chairperson of the department, Dr. Mary Balkun, Fahy 362, for reassignment. Direct any students who have not taken the Placement Test to Freshman Studies in Mooney Hall or to the Director of Basic Skills, Dr. Ed Jones, to take it.  No one may be enrolled in an English class without department placement. This is each instructor's responsibility to oversee.

Introduction
ENGL 1201 College English I and ENGL 1201-0160  are First Year Writing Courses the writing and reading processes of expository and persuasive rhetoric/argument, in addition to an EXPLORATORY ESSAY (to be completed during the first week of the term and not formally graded). In addition to strong ideas and organization, these papers should also demonstrate the students' understanding of sound grammar, mechanics, and vocabulary.  Prewriting and rewriting techniques stress as necessary to all papers the importance of gathering, organizing, clarifying, shaping, drafting, and revising material as necessary to all papers. ENGL 1201 requires students to write short, well-developed papers; ENGL 1202 requires them to write longer, research-based papers. The readings from the ENGL 1201 textbook are models the students will use in developing their own papers. College English I readings are primarily essays. College English II introduces the short story, poetry, and drama.

General Assignments
Writing assignments will emphasize sound principles of English. To this end, students will be taught how to use the steps of the writing process—prewriting, outlining, drafting, and revision-- to develop their ideas. To prepare students for college-level writing, they are required to use their reading as the basis for their writing assignments in ENGL 1201. Paper topics should be directly related to the essays students have read for class in The McGraw-Hill Reader. When papers are due, you must collect all phases of the process: prewriting, outlines, drafts, and the final paper. Doing this will encourage students to work thoughtfully through each stage of the process and helps them avoid the temptation of plagiarism.

Instructors are required to collect a complete draft of each essay and return it with comments for the purpose of revision.  Students will thus produce at least 10 extended pieces of writing during the semester.


All essay assignments should emphasize ideas as central to good writing. Students will be required to learn and use five patterns of organization throughout the semester (Definition, Process Analysis, Cause and Effect, Division and Classification, Comparison and Contrast), thereby acquiring a variety of techniques for developing their ideas and arguments. They will also be required to learn and use other writing concepts(Audience, Tone and Stance, Logical Fallacies, Logic and Metaphor, Bias in Language) incrementally throughout the semester.
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The McGraw-Hill Reader should be the focus of class discussions and journal assignments. Paper topics should also emanate from the readings. Have students read at least four of the text essays for each writing assignment. While The McGraw-Hill Reader may occasionally be supplemented with other materials, the text should be the major source for assigned readings. N.B. This is not a literature course. Do not assign readings in fiction, poetry, or drama, even if they are included in the text.   Instructors are encouraged to use “assignment sequencing” as they plan their writing assignments.  This term refers, in general, to having a goal and working toward it, with a clearly planned series of assignments leading up to it.  For more information on assignments sequences, go to the 1201 website: http://artsci.shu.edu/english/1201/assignment-sequences/assignment-sequences_index.htm.


The Bedford Handbook should be used to supplement The McGraw-Hill Reader to guide the students toward sound writing and to strengthen individual skills. Part I in the Handbook, "Composing and Revising," should be studied along with prewriting skills in the first few weeks of the semester. From that point students should be instructed to use the Handbook as problems arise on an individual or group basis.

First Year Students’ Summer Reading and the Diagnostic Essay

The entire First Year class will read a single book, Da Chen’s Sounds of the River, selected by members of the English Department and Dean of Freshman Studies.    This book will be used by the Freshman Mentors, along with Study Questions provided by the English Department in meetings with the students during the summer.   It is required that all diagnostic essay questions, done the first day of class, be about this text.  You may design your own question, but it must be based on this text.  Do take some time to read it during the summer.
At the first class meeting, students must write an essay in class to be used for diagnostic purposes. The instructor should comment at length on these essays and return them as soon as possible. This gives the instructor and the students an opportunity to assess strengths and weaknesses and plan accordingly.

First Writing Assignment
In order to provide a context for the teaching of the writing process, instructors are asked to have students produce a short essay prototype, practicing the techniques of the writing process: prewriting, outlining, drafting, revising, and (if the instructor chooses) peer review. This should not be a graded essay but rather one used primarily for diagnostic purposes; however, it should be returned with extensive instructor comments. Instructors can choose to indicate what grade the essay and preliminary "steps" would have received for sample purposes.

In-Class Essay
Because students receive tutoring and other outside assistance, it is sometimes difficult to determine exactly what progress they are making. Thus, each instructor is required to administer an in-class writing assignment at the mid-term in order to get a first-hand sample of students' writing. This can also be used as a follow-up diagnostic to assess continuing needs and problem areas. The in-class essay should be scheduled into the syllabus from the outset.

Conferencing
All instructors in 1201 and 1202 are required to hold individual conferences with each student at the time the first formal writing assignment is returned; (this should be no later than the end of the third week of the semester in 1201). We strongly encourage a similar conference be scheduled at the mid-term to discuss students' progress in the course, in addition to frequent meetings with students outside of class throughout the semester

Attendance Policy
The English Department has approved an attendance policy for all composition classes. Instructors must support this policy. The most practical way to do this is to treat the class as a workshop in which students are responsible for at least one piece of writing for each class session; (this will put the emphasis on work missed rather on a lack of attendance). In-class writing assignments might take any of the following forms: journal entry, quiz, peer review, response to prompt either before or after in-class discussion/ activity, evaluation, written practice of a required rhetorical/research/ grammatical concept.

Please include the following statement on your course syllabus:
College English I is a writing workshop, which means that the work we do in class is an essential component of the course. This includes in-class writing assignments, quizzes, note-taking, peer review, and group work. Students with more than 6 absences, either excused or unexcused (FOUR ABSENCES FOR CLASSES THAT MEET TWICE A WEEK), will have failed to complete a substantial number of these writing assignments, and will therefore be unable to pass College English I, unless there is an exceptional situation (see below).   Linked 1201 sections, normally meeting FIVE times a week, would have a limit of EIGHT absences. 

An "excused" absence is one documented by either the Athletic Department or the Dean for Community Development, Dawn Williams. Instructors should not accept doctor's notes as proof of excused absences. Please advise freshmen with significant medical or family problems to speak with their mentor and/or someone in Dean Williams' office, x9076, to obtain assistance and official excuses for these absences.
Occasionally a student will have a legitimate reason for being absent more than six times (or four or eight, as listed above, depending on the number of class meetings)—usually medical, sometimes athletic.  These excused absences should be documented by either the Athletic Department or the Dean for Community Development, Dawn Williams.   If the absences do not extend much past the limit (6, 4, 8) and the student consistently takes responsibility for these absences, exceptions may be made to the absence policy.  However, if you are considering passing anyone else who has more than 6 (or 4 or 8, depending on the number of class meetings) absences, you must speak to the Director of First Year Writing or, in the case of 1201-0160, the Director of Basic Skills.

 

Journals
Journals (or other kinds of informal writing) are regarded as basic to any writing course. Require students to use them to record academic responses to the readings and other assigned work. Some instructors assign a journal entry for each essay read, including commentary about the essay and reactions to the rhetorical pattern. Students can also use their journals to expand upon a point brought up in class or to develop potential topics for future papers. The journal should not be a personal diary but rather an extension of the course work. Specify the criteria for an acceptable journal assignment (purpose, length, format) on the syllabus. Periodically check the journals. This can be done by having students indicate several selections to be read in full and checking the rest for degree of completeness. Most instructors collect journals two or three times during the semester. Assess the journal and include it in the calculations for the final grade. Students can post their journals in Blackboard's discussion area. If having students submit the journal on disk, be sure to check for viruses using the anti-virus program on the lap top before opening any files. Some faculty use other forms of informal writing instead of the journal.  Others use both.  The key thing is to make sure that your students have plenty of opportunity to informal and ungraded (in the formal sense) work.

Quizzes
Some form of quizzing or in-class writing about reading assignments is strongly encouraged in ENGL 1201 for a variety of reasons:
·     to encourage students to attend class
·     to make sure students read the assignments and do so critically and analytically
·     to encourage to students to participate thoughtfully in class    

Grammar
While some instructors like to set aside regular class time for grammar instruction/practice/review, others prefer a holistic approach, allowing such work to be determined by the types of errors students make in their papers. The approach depends on both the instructor and the needs of the particular class. In either case, it is important that students use the Handbook throughout the semester. They should be directed to specific pages and chapters for additional help with mechanical, grammatical, or other problems.

 

Research
Students are introduced to the basic elements and methods of research and the MLA style of documentation and formatting in ENGL 1201, which will prepare them for longer papers in ENGL 1202. This preparation should include, above all, critical analysis of texts and evidence the ability to link texts in a coherent and meaningful way.  Research skills should also include the following:

·     library research
·     use of primary and secondary texts from a variety of sources
·     note-taking *
·     formal outlining (with stated thesis)

·     direct quotation, paraphrasing, summarizing, blocking a quotation
·     in-text citation format
·     Works Cited format
·     Searching the internet and selected computer databases.


The English Department requires that students be taught the use of the MLA format for all papers. This includes such elements as the heading, title, margins, and pagination. This information is available in the Handbook.

*To date, the department policy has been to teach students the note card method of taking notes (see Handbook), using only exact quotations.  However, since photocopy machines and computers are changing the way researchers work, we allow for the fact that some instructors will use a variation of the note card system. In any case, please be sure that your students are culling targeted references from their sources and not just using highlighted, disorganized photocopies.


The reasoning behind using note cards is as follows:

·     note cards encourage students to take notes more selectively and carefully than simply highlighting a photocopy
·     note cards can be organized for submission with the paper
·     the note card format encourages clear documentation .


However, students may also achieve the same results by taking notes on their lap tops. Some instructors allow a combination of note cards (some of which contain observations/ research questions, not just notes) and photocopies. Whichever technique is used, the aim should be as follows:

·     to teach students how to think about and collect information in a careful way
·     to teach students how to document that information
·     to teach students how to take notes that are cumulative and proceed from broad coverage to depth of coverage on a topic.

Because paraphrasing and summarizing are skills students are expected to master—and these can only be checked for accuracy if the original wording is available to the instructor—students should be asked to use only exact quotations when they take their notes, whatever the format



Portfolios
Writing portfolios – usually containing examples of various kinds of writing as well as all of the writing and related draft work --can be used to evaluate student progress over the course of a semester. It also helps students keep their work organized, which is a very important lesson for every college student. This technique is optional.

 
Meta-writing
Meta-writing is a technique whereby students analyze and write about their own writing in order to identify problems they are having during the composing process. Try this early in the semester for the most effective results. It can be as directed or undirected as the instructor likes. This technique can be used as a regular part of the writing process or as a tool to help students evaluate their progress at various stages of the course.


Peer Review

Peer review should be a part of every writing class.   Students can exchange papers in class, working in pairs or small groups.   They can also work at home, using Blackboard, and commenting on each other’s drafts.   The entire class might be assigned a particular student’s essay for a group workshop.  There are many ways of incorporating peer breview into your class.   It is helpful to give students some guiding questions for peer review.   It is also helpful to have them write (or type on Blackboard) their comments and to require that these comments be handed in.   If you have any questions about how to use peer review in your classes, please contact the Director of First Year Writing or the Director of Basic Skills.

Library Orientation
 
College English I instructors are required to arrange for a library session for their students.  PRIOR TO THE ORIENTATION, INSTRUCTORS SHOULD HAVE STUDENTS USE THE MATERIALS ON THE LIBRARY'S INFORMATION LITERACY SITE (http://library.shu.edu/cdi4lib/silt2/index.html), BOTH THE INTERACTIVE TOUR AND THE RESOURCES FOR 1201.   The library assignment should be specific and directed to the work of your course.  It should go beyond the general library tour students are given in Freshman Orientation and familiarize them with the search and research procedures necessary for college papers. The assignment for the orientation should be directly related to a paper the students are or will be writing in ENGL 1201.

BEGINNING WITH THE SPRING OF 2003, ORIENATIONS ARE NORMALLY HELD IN THE REGULAR CLASSROOM, NOT IN THE LIBRARY, WITH THE LIBRARIAN COMING TO YOUR CLASS.   Orientations can be scheduled by completing the application at this link http://tltc.shu.edu/library/calendar.php.  The orientation should be scheduled prior to or during Unit 5 on the syllabus below.  At the summer orientation, you will be given the window of dates within which to schedule your library orientation.    All faculty should contact the librarian scheduled to do their class's orientation to discuss their plans for the orientation and send a copy of their students' library assignment at least TWO WEEKS PRIOR to the session.  AFTER COMPLETING THE ORIENTATION, STUDENTS SHOULD BE REQUIRED TO TAKE THE ENGLISH 1201 LIBRARY QUIZ (http://library.shu.edu/cdi4/LibraryQuiz.htm).  IN ORDER TO ASSESS THEIR KNOWLEDGE OF THE LIBRARY AND ITS RESOURCES.  Direct any general questions about library orientations to either Dr. Anthony Lee, Walsh Library, the English Department’s Library Liaison, or Dr. Nancy Enright, Director of First Year Writing.   For specific questions about your scheduled orientation, you may contact either Dr. Beth Bloom, Walsh Library, or Dr. Nancy Enright.


Exams
All instructors are required by the University to give a final exam. This must be administered during the scheduled exam period for the course; it may not be administered during a regular class session. The exam schedule can be found in the course catalog each semester. It is also made available around campus several weeks prior to exam week. All composition instructors are required to submit a copy of their final exam to Dr. Nancy Enright, the Director of First Year Writing, at least one week prior to the date on which it will be administered. You may do this through the on-line Blackboard Community for Writing Faculty.  Most instructors do not give a mid-term examination in College English I. The required in-class essay can serve the same purpose and give an indication of students' progress in the course. See the section above for more on this requirement.

 

Grading
Since ENGL 1201 is a writing course, the majority of the final grade should be based on the five final papers the students produce. A typical breakdown might look as follows:

Final Papers: 50% [Some instructors prefer to weigh the later papers more heavily
due to their length and level of difficulty.]

 

Segments of papers (prewriting, outline, draft): 10%

 

Attendance (and participation (the latter includes participation in writing assignments in class): 15 %

Writing Center: 5% (or some other specific way of counting it)

 

Journal: 10%

 

Final exam: 10% (this is a formality and should not be an excessive percentage of the final grade).

See the 1201 website for information on grading criteria.  http://artsci.shu.edu/english/1201.

 

Course Evaluations
There are three types of course evaluations administered by the English Department. The first is a University evaluation. Instructors will receive this at least one week before the end of the semester. Instructions for administering this evaluation will be included. Instructors are also required to have students complete the departmental evaluation form. This will also be available at least one week before the end of the semester from the Department secretary, Ms. Rebecca Warren. Instructors should leave copies of the evaluations from College English I classes in the Director's mailbox by the end of exam week. After they have been reviewed, they will be added to the instructor's departmental file. Finally, instructors are asked to administer a Writing Center evaluation to those students who availed themselves of this service.  These will be reviewed by the Writing Center staff to improve services.


Observations
Graduate, adjunct, term-contract, and tenure-track instructors are observed at least once during the academic year by a full-time faculty member. Additional observations may be conducted on an as-needed basis. These observations are scheduled by the Director of First Year Writing or, for instructors of 1201-0160, the Director of Basic Skills.  TAs are observed once each semester by the Director. After the observation, instructors receive a written evaluation of their performance. It is strongly advised that instructors meet with the observing faculty member prior to the class to discuss the lesson plan, objectives, and strategies to be used. The instructor should also be provided with any materials necessary for making an informed evaluation. TAs are required to submit a written lesson plan at least three days prior to their observation.

Mobile Computing
Seton Hall University has made a commitment to a mobile computing initiative. As a result, incoming freshmen are equipped with laptop computers and instructors are expected to incorporate elements of information technology (IT) into their courses. This can mean e-mail, chat rooms, supplementing regular office hours with an on-line hour, and requiring web searches. The CTC offers training and support for Blackboard, the program adapted for all English courses.



Use of technology in class requires vigilance. You must be aware at all times of what your students are doing. This means walking around the room, having students close laptops when they are not specifically in use, and giving students specific assignments and deadlines. Students should not be checking e-mail, instant-messaging, participating in a chat room, or surfing the net while the rest of the class is otherwise engaged. SoftwareSecure, a software program available to SHU faculty and students, can help minimize these distractions and can be installed on your laptop if you plan to use the technology extensively in the classroom. Please see Dr. Kelly Shea, who is familiar with SoftwareSecure,  or David Middleton and
Danielle Salomone of TLTC for further information on this tool.


The Writing Center
Staffed with English faculty, peer tutors, graduate students, and professional adjuncts, the Writing Center is an important resource for all writers on campus. The Writing Center is. It is located in Fahy 251, on the second floor, across from the Language Lab and next to the Fahy Public Lab. Undergraduate, graduate, and faculty tutors are available, at no cost, to help students in prewriting, writing, and revising their papers on an individual and small-group basis. Although drop-ins can be accommodated, students are encouraged to make appointments to guarantee that tutors will be available.

Students in ENGL 1201 are required to attend  two tutoring sessions during the semester, with more being possibly required at the instructor’s discretion. Students in ENGL 1201-0160 are required to attend six tutoring session in addition to their weekly in-class tutoring sessions. However, instructors may also reduce (to no fewer than three) or increase (to no more than 10) the number of sessions a student attends based on writing submitted for the course. This decision should not be made before the first formal writing assignment is submitted and graded. English 1201 and 1202 students will make their own appointments directly with the Writing Center. For students in linked classes, the tutor visits to the classroom and the Writing Center sessions will be scheduled during the first two weeks of classes. 1201/0160/0180 instructors will need to build the regular, once-per-week tutor visit into their syllabi. Obviously, this will be the time to schedule workshops of drafts, peer critique, group work on readings, or other in-class activities that would benefit from more than one person walking around assisting students.   

After each Writing Center visit, instructors will receive a brief report on each session from the tutor. Some students are required to attend tutoring on a weekly or twice-weekly basis as a condition of their passing from basic skills courses into ENGL 1201. Instructors will receive a list of these students from the Director of Basic Skills, Dr. Ed Jones. Notify students that they must fulfill this requirement or their final grade for College English I will be lowered. Instructors must include the Writing Center requirement in their grading formula (at least 5% or something equivalent).

The SHU OWL (On-line Writing Lab) is also available to assist students, faculty, and staff. However, this may not be used as a substitute for the required sessions for ENGL 1201 or ENGL 1202 students. They must attend the Writing Center in person to fulfill the course requirement. The OWL is located at http://academic.shu.edu/owl/ , which is found on the Writing Center home page, http://artsci.shu.edu/english/wc/.
The Writing Center is open Mondays through Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., Fridays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and, on an as-needed basis, Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Call ext. 7501 or 2183 for more information and to make an appointment.

Poetry-in-The-Round
Seton Hall is fortunate to sponsor Poetry-in-the-Round, currently directed by Dr. Jeff Gray of the English Department. In the past, readings have been given by the late James Merrill, Geoffrey Hilll, Thylias Moss, Joyce Carol Oates, Gwendolyn Brooks, Adrienne Rich, and many others. Students should be strongly encouraged to attend one of these readings since Poetry-in-the-Round offers cultural experiences that can enhance their studies. In 1201 students might be required to write an essay about their experience at a poetry reading for extra credit. Such an assignment may not substitute for the regular, required papers in the course. Each year's schedule of poets and authors is posted in the fall. Upcoming events will also be posted.

Office Hours
All instructors at the university are required to keep at least one office hour for each course they teach. These should be scheduled at reasonable times, and must be listed on the syllabus. During the first week of each semester, the Department secretary will ask each instructor to fill out a form so hours can be posted for student reference.

Syllabus Approval
All ENGL 1201 instructors must give the Director of First Year Writing a copy of their syllabus and have it approved before the semester begins. All ENGL 1201-0160 instructors must give the Director of Basic Skills a copy of their syllabus and have it approved before the semester begins.   The syllabus should indicate all major assignments and their due dates, readings, and other requirements of the course.  A weekly guideline (or possibly daily) should indicate clearly to students what they are to expect in the course.   Grading standards and percentages should be clearly indicated.    TAs should do so by the specified date; all other instructors should do so at least one week prior to the start of the semester. Although changes to accommodate individual classes are expected, the University requires that each faculty member distribute a syllabus during the first week of classes. In addition, copies of the English Department's policy on plagiarism and cheating must be distributed with the syllabus and discussed in class. These are available through the department secretary.  


Note: During the course of the semester, teaching assistants must also provide Dr. Nancy Enright, Director of First Year Writing, with a copy of all hand-outs – whether assignments, tests, quizzes, or informational hand-outs – before distributing them in class. This requirement also applies to electronic handouts, which should be e-mailed or printed out. Materials, in whatever form, must be submitted at least three days prior to their intended distribution date in order to provide adequate time for review.

Syllabus Template for College English I


The premise for the course outlined below is that argument is central to good writing. The various modes should be the emphasis of writing assignments rather than subjects in and of themselves. Throughout the semester, the following concepts—each of which is discussed in the Reader and Handbook-- should be addressed on a regular basis:

·     idea as central to good writing
·     thinking critically and analytically about writing, whether one's own or others'
·     audience and tone
·     types of argument--appeal to intelligence/ reason (logos), appeal to the emotions(pathos), and appeal to ethics (ethos)--and their uses.
·     logical development of ideas
·     avoiding biased language

Please check the University's syllabus guidelines at the end of this document for specific information to be included in your final syllabus.

College English I – General Syllabus


Week I: Introduction; diagnostic essay on Sounds of the River by Da Chen (see page 2 of this document); syllabus review; discuss Writing Center requirement (see page 8 of this document). The diagnostic essay should be returned with instructor comments, but no grade. . Instructors might choose to indicate what grade the essay and preliminary "steps" would have received for sample purposes.


 

 

 

 

Week II:  “Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing” – Chapter I, The McGraw-Hill Reader
 "The Writing Process” – Part I,  The Bedford Handbook
Goal:  Instructors should introduce the overall process of writing expository prose, explaining the rhetorical modes in a general way.   Students should understand that the modes will be used in the essays, with a different mode being focused on for each assignment.  However, it should be made clear that a rhetorical mode will not be the main structure for an assignment, but used as appropriate to the particular assignment for that unit.   The main focus of the assignment should be the overall principle for that unit (such as “exploration” for unit 1 or “analysis of a written text” in unit 3).   For each unit also, a research and stylistic concept should be discussed.  See details that follow and the sample syllabus for ideas on how to set up these units.   The 1201 website also offers instructional ideas.    See also the Writing Faculty Blackboard course for how your colleagues structure their syllabi and assignments.

Weeks III: Exploratory Essay (Ungraded)
Goal: Students will consider an issue based on their reading, as well as their own experiences. The purpose of this assignment is to encourage students to think about an issue, to integrate their own experiences with their reading, and to develop an idea about that issue.  To do this they must evidence the ability to think critically about texts, to link ideas found in outside sources together and with their own ideas, and to incorporate material from one of the unit essays to support and/or connect with their ideas . 

Requirements for Exploratory Essay:
Read at least two essays in the unit
Paper: 2-3 pages, with 12 pt. font (at least 500 words)

Rhetorical concept/ Developmental strategy: (to be determined by instructor – see list below)
Stylistic concept: (to be determined by instructor – see list below)
Research concepts: Incorporation of quotations; in-text citations and Works Cited (MLA format)
Grammar concepts: (to be determined by instructor)
 


Weeks IV and V: Analytical Essay I  (of a visual text)
Goal: Students will examine a visual text, interpret its meaning, and develop an argument in which their ideas about the image are developed by serious examination of ideas about images in one or more of the essays they have read. The purpose of this assignment is to further develop students' analytical skills by considering different types of texts in conjunction.

 

Requirements for Analytical Essay I:
Read at least four essays or 20 pages in the unit
Paper: 2-3 pages (500-750 words)
Rhetorical concept/ Developmental strategy: (to be determined by instructor – see list below)
Stylistic concept: (to be determined by instructor – see list below)
Research concept: Note taking; further practice in all previous techniques
Grammar concepts: (to be determined by instructor)

Weeks VI, VII, and VIII: Analytical Essay II  (of a written text)
Goal: Students will closely analyze a text, consider the relationship between what is said (the argument being made/ the thesis) and how it is said (rhetorical strategy, tone and stance, audience, language), evaluate the value of the ideas, and develop an argument about the relationship of content to form based on this judgment. The purpose of this assignment is for students to further develop their reading and analytical skills and to construct an argument based on their observations.
1201 students should have attended at least one Writing Center session; 1201/0160/0180 students should have attended second and third Writing Center sessions.

Requirements for Analytical Essay II :
Read at least four essays or 20 pages in the unit
Paper: 2-3 pages (500-750 words)
Rhetorical concept/ Developmental strategy: (to be determined by instructor – see list below)
Stylistic concept: (to be determined by instructor – see list below)
Research concept: Paraphrasing and summarizing; further practice in all previous techniques
Grammar concepts: (to be determined by instructor)

Weeks IX, X, and XI: Persuasive Essay
Goal: Students will write a paper taking a position on an issue, with the focus on developing a persuasive argument. They must use at least two of the text essays to support their position. The purpose of this assignment is to develop students' ability to construct a convincing argument and use textual material in support of that argument.

Part of this process should include the consideration of a perspective (or perspectives) different from the student’s own. 

 

1201/0160/0180 students should have attended fourth and/or fifth Writing Center sessions.



Requirements for Persuasive Essay:

Have students read “Reading and Writing Effective Arguments” – Chapter 2, The McGraw-Hill Reader.
Read at least four essays or 20 pages in the unit
Paper: 3-5 pages (750-1250 words)
Rhetorical concept/ Developmental strategy: (to be determined by instructor – see list below)
Stylistic concept: (to be determined by instructor – see list below)
Research concept: Analyzing and evaluating web sites; further practice in all previous techniques
Grammar concepts: (to be determined by instructor)

Weeks XII, XIII, and XIV: Research Essay
Goal: Students will develop a researched argument paper, going beyond the text essays and finding at least two or three outside sources of different types to connect with their position. They will be required to acknowledge and evaluate differing opinions in their essay. The purpose of this assignment is to prepare students for the type of research writing they will be expected to do in their classes, using outside sources and the full range of research writing techniques.

Requirements for Research Essay:

Have students read “A Guide to Research and Documentation” – Chapter 12, The McGraw-Hill Reader.
Read at least four essays or 20 pages in the unit
Paper: 3-5 pages (750-1250 words)
Rhetorical concept/ Developmental strategy: (to be determined by instructor – see list below)
Stylistic concept: (to be determined by instructor – see list below)
Research concept: Research techniques; further practice in all previous techniques
Grammar concepts: (to be determined by instructor)

1201 students should have attended their second Writing Center session. 1201/0160/0180 students should have attended fifth and/or final Writing Center sessions.
Modes of arrangement (one per unit/ paper):
Definition  (Handbook 86-87; McGraw-Hill Reader, Chapter 1, 33-34).
Cause and Effect (Handbook 84, 508, 510; McGraw-Hill Reader, Chapter 1, “Causal Analysis,” 31-33).
Comparison and Contrast (Handbook 82-83)
Process Analysis (Sequencing); (Handbook 81-82; McGraw-Hill, Chapter 1, 29-30).
Division and Classification (Handbook 85-86; McGraw-Hill Reader, “Classification,” Chapter 1, 34-36).

Stylistic concepts to be developed cumulatively throughout the semester (one introduced per unit/ paper):
Purpose and audience (Handbook 4- 5, 10-14, 53-57, 220-221, 493)
Tone and stance (Handbook 53, 56-57)
Logic, metaphor, and analogy (Handbook 509, 512, 237-238, 83, 508)

Logical fallacies (Handbook 506-515)
Bias in language (Handbook 552-553).

 

 

 

College English I - Sample Syllabus


Week I: Introduction; validation essay; syllabus review

Week II:Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing” – Chapter I, The McGraw-Hill Reader
 "The Writing Process” – Part I,  The Bedford Handbook

Practice prewriting, drafting in preparation for the Exploratory Essay.


Weeks III: Exploratory Essay: “Education: How, What, and Why Do We Learn?” McGaw-Hill Reader, Chapter 3.


Requirements for Exploratory Essay:
Read at least two essays in the unit
Paper: 2-3 pages long (500-750 words)
Rhetorical concept/ Developmental strategy: Process Analysis (Sequencing) ; McGraw-Hill, Chapter 1 (29-30).
Stylistic concept: Purpose and audience
Research concepts: Incorporation of quotations; in-text citations and Works Cited (MLA format)
Grammar concepts: "Punctuation"

Weeks IV and V: Critical/Analytical Essay I (of a Visual Text): “Communication, Film, and Media: How Do We Express Ourselves?” McGraw-Hill Reader, Chapter 9.

Requirements for Analytical Essay I: Read at least four essays or 20 pages in the unit
Paper: 2-3 pages long (500-750 words)
Rhetorical concept/ Developmental strategy: Division and Classification; McGraw-Hill Reader, Chapter 1 (34-36).
Stylistic concept: Bias in language
Research concept: Note taking; further practice in all previous techniques
Grammar concepts: "Word Choice," "Clear Sentences"
Supplemental Reading Suggestions:



Weeks VI, VII, and VIII: Critical/Analytical Essay II (of a Written Text): “Government, Politics, and Social Justice: How Do We Decide What is Fair?” – McGraw-Hill Reader, Chapter 6.
Required Concepts for Analytical Essay II:

Read at least four essays or 20 pages in the unit
Paper: 2-3 pages long (500-750 words)
Rhetorical concept/ Developmental strategy: Definition; McGraw-Hill Reader, Chapter1 (33-34).
Stylistic concept: Logic, metaphor and analogy
Research concept: Paraphrasing and summarizing; further practice in all previous techniques
Grammar concepts: "Grammatical Sentences"

Weeks IX, X, and XI: Persuasive Essay: “Science and Technology: What Can Science Teach Us?” – McGraw-Hill Reader, Chapter 10.


Requirements for Persuasive Essay:
Read “Reading and Writing Effective Arguments” – Chapter 2, The McGraw-Hill Reader.

Read at least four essays or 20 pages in the unit
Paper: 3-5 pages long (750-1250 words)
Rhetorical concept: Causal Analysis; McGraw-Hill Reader, Chapter 1 (31-33).
Stylistic concept: Tone and stance
Research concept: Analyzing and evaluating web sites; further practice in all previous techniques
Grammar concepts: "Critical Thinking"

Weeks XII, XIII, and XIV: Research Essay: “Philosophy, Ethics, and Religion: What Do We Believe?” – McGraw-Hill Reader, Chapter 8.
         
Requirements for Research Essay:
Read “A Guide to Research and Documentation” – Chapter 12, The McGraw-Hill Reader.
Read at least four essays or 20 pages in the unit
Paper: 3-5 pages long (750-1250 words)
Rhetorical concept/ Developmental strategy: Comparison and Contrast, The McGraw-Hill Reader, Chapter 1 (30-31).
Stylistic concept: Logical fallacies
Research concept: Research techniques; further practice in all previous techniques
Grammar concepts: "Mechanics"

Other concepts to be developed cumulatively throughout the semester (one introduced per unit/ paper)
Purpose and audience
Tone and stance
Logic, metaphor, and analogy
Logical fallacies
Bias in language

Sample Lesson Plan for College English I


"Government, Politics, and Social Justice:  How Do We Decide What Is Fair?" – McGraw-Hill Reader, Chapter 6 (three selections, and one selection from Chapter 7, “Business and Economics: How Do We Earn Our Keep?”)  Note that it is OK to add a selection from another unit if it is relevant to the theme of the unit you are covering and the goals of the class.

 

Look at the theme of justice and the overall question of Chapter 6: “How Do We Decide What Is Fair?” as it is explored in the following readings:

 

Thomas Jefferson, “The Declaration of Independence: In Congress, July 4, 1776” (from Chapter 6)

Martin Luther King, Jr., “The World House” (from Chapter 6)

Niccolo Machiavelli, “The Circle of Governments” (from Chapter 6)

Virginia Woolf, “Professions for Women” (from Chapter 7)


 

·     Students will use double-entry journal technique throughout the semester to encourage critical and analytical reading/ thinking.

·     Students will use the double-entry journal technique to develop their own topic based on the question of justice/fairness.

Day 1:
Have students create a list of words/ phrases they consider relevant to the question of social justice. 


Days 2 and 3:
Discuss the first two essays, focusing on several things:

1.     the ways each one relates to the concept of justice and/or fairness
2.     the specific focus of each essay
3.     stylistic concept for the unit
Use students' notes from double-journal entry technique to start discussion.

Day 4:
Teach research technique for the unit; use group assignment to foster collaboration; discuss third essay (see above) and connect to paper.

Day 5:
Discuss final essay (see above) and connect to paper.

Day 6:
Peer Review